Saturday, November 01, 2008

Eunoia

This link was passed along from A.M. via a contributor, about Christian Bök's new book which uses only one (orthographic) vowel per chapter. Of course, much like on this blog, the comments are often better than the story. The exercise calls to mind Gadsby, the novel written without using the letter 'e' and other efforts.

Much more interesting would be prose restricted to single vowel sounds over long stretches. There's plenty of that in poetry, but is there prose like that?

5 comments:

Enoch Guimond said...

Actually, The main part of the book, the five chapters (one for each vowel) seem to be prose. And they are amazing to read, especially aloud. The whole book is available online at: http://www.chbooks.com/archives/online_books/eunoia/text.html

I enjoy your blog, Mr. Verb.

Virtual Linguist said...

Cool blog! So good. Lots of good posts. No poor words. Blog tomorrow. Do lots of posts. Don't stop! Lots of joy.

Mr. Verb said...

Thanks to both of you.

Enoch, right, reading aloud is key. If he'd used the same vowel sounds instead of the same vowel symbols, it'd be very cool.

VL, you exemplify something I thought about trying this morning, namely how many vowel sounds you can wring out of one symbol. You've go /u:/, /o:/, /a/, /ʌ/, and more, with orthographic 'o'. Nicely done!

Peter said...

"the novel written without using the letter and other efforts."

I don't get this...

Mr. Verb said...

Oops. Without the letter 'e'. I used the symbol for spelling (<>) and that got interpreted as html code.